Long time

Wow it has been a long time since I have posted to my blog.  Life and work, just kept seemingly to get in the way.

And now so many things have changed.  With Social Security we know have 75 day notice prior to the hearing.  This means that you and, if you have one, your attorney, will now get a hearing date at least 75 days away, instead of 20.  This change makes it much easier to have a complete file, especially with those hospitals that take 60 or more days to get their records out.

Other changes include a requirement that SSA be notified or provided records at least 5 business days prior to hearing.  With the 75 day notice, this rule has minimal effect on the way most SSA cases are run.

The atmosphere with SSA is still stacked against someone applying for disability.  Rhetoric of fraud has only increased with the Conn case in Kentucky, despite multiple reports by SSA that fraud is actually very tiny in the system.

Approval rate for all cases, nationwide, runs just under 50%, which means over half of everyone that applies is ultimately denied benefits.  This makes having assistance even more important.

Finally, for those folks in Northeast Ohio, I am expanded my practice beyond just SSA disability and will now also be taken family law, probate (guardians, wills, health directives, power of attorneys), and traffic cases.  Let me help you change your child support, avoid points on your license, or tell people your wishes if you are sick or when you pass away.

Income chart for Children’s SSI

Social Security has posted on it’s website an income chart for children’s SSI eligibility.  While there are lots of exceptions and other asset requirements that may affect eligibility, the chart gives you a good idea of how much income a family can make and the child still be eligible for SSI.  The full rules can be found here

 

Gross monthly income BELOW the dollar amounts shown means a disabled child may be eligible for SSI benefits.

Amounts given are general guidelines only.

Number of
ineligible
children in
household
All income is earned All income is unearned
One parent in
household
Two parents in
household
One parent in
household
Two parents in
household
0

$ 3,009

$ 3,731

$ 1,482

$ 1,843

1

$ 3,370

$ 4,092

$ 1,843

$ 2,204

2

$ 3,731

$ 4,453

$ 2,204

$ 2,565

3

$ 4,092

$ 4,814

$ 2,565

$ 2,926

4

$ 4,453

$ 5,175

$ 2,926

$ 3,287

5

$ 4,874

$ 5,536

$ 3,287

$ 3,648

6

$ 5,175

$ 5,897

$ 3,648

$ 4,009

SSA adds 25 more compassionate allowances

http://www.ssa.gov/news.htm#cal

1.      Angiosarcoma

2.      Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor

3.      Chronic Idiopathic Intestinal Pseudo Obstruction

4.      Coffin- Lowry Syndrome

5.      Esthesioneuroblastoma

6.      Giant Axonal Neuropathy

7.      Hoyeaal-Hreidarsson Syndrome

8.      Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

9.      Joubert Syndrome

10.     Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis

11.     Liposarcoma- metastatic or recurrent

12.     Malignant Ectomesenchymoma

13.     Malignant Renal Rhabdoid Tumor

14.     Marshall-Smith Syndrome

15.     Oligodendroglioma Brain Tumor- Grade III

16.     Pallister-Killian Syndrome

17.     Progressive Bulbar Palsy

18.     Prostate Cancer – Hormone Refractory Disease – or with visceral metastases

19.     Revesz Syndrome

20.     Seckel Syndrome

21.     Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome

22.     Small Cell Cancer of the Thymus

23.     Soft Tissue Sarcoma- with distant metastases or recurrent

24.     X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease

25.     X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

With these 25 conditions, there are now 225 compassionate allowances.  Compassionate allowances allow your claim to be fast tracked for a decision by Social Security and require less medical documentation.

 

Please contact me with any questions about a compassionate allowance claim or with your disability questions.

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